The Boundary Value Problem of Genomics

This was supposed to be my research blog, but then became my anti-research blog, and now it is my inanity outlet. That's what I should change the name to, if I ever figure that out.




(via TAKE TWO - T Magazine)
Michael Kors and Amy Sedaris compare notes on various overpriced products (both have names ending in “s”!).  Example:
Michael — “Unfortunately, in this shot, I think I’m in desperate need of a nose job.”
Amy — “I don’t even wear jewelry with my name on it. It’s not good for pedophiles.”


(via TAKE TWO - T Magazine)

Michael Kors and Amy Sedaris compare notes on various overpriced products (both have names ending in “s”!).  Example:

Michael — “Unfortunately, in this shot, I think I’m in desperate need of a nose job.”

Amy — “I don’t even wear jewelry with my name on it. It’s not good for pedophiles.”

The weather’s getting better, and my apartment is finally, finally!, clean.  I feel like cooking again.  Maybe I’ll try this bulgur wheat casserole…

I used to have a goal of cooking a bunch of the NYTimes’ “Recipes for Health.”  But then I was dating this guy who took me out a lot, and I sort of went with it, even though I much prefer eating at home.  That didn’t work out, obviously, and so here I am, back in the kitchen.  Probably not going to go whole hog on the RfH, though.  Going to try to learn some of my mum’s recipes in the future, I think.
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The weather’s getting better, and my apartment is finally, finally!, clean.  I feel like cooking again.  Maybe I’ll try this bulgur wheat casserole…

I used to have a goal of cooking a bunch of the NYTimes’ “Recipes for Health.”  But then I was dating this guy who took me out a lot, and I sort of went with it, even though I much prefer eating at home.  That didn’t work out, obviously, and so here I am, back in the kitchen.  Probably not going to go whole hog on the RfH, though.  Going to try to learn some of my mum’s recipes in the future, I think.

(Source: The New York Times)

I’ve been trying to up my reading.  I failed last year, but this year, even though it’s only been 2 weeks, has been pretty good.  I wanted to mix some light in with the Serious Literary, so I decided to get into some mysteries.  I turned to the New York Times Book Review for some recommendations — don’t want to go totally lowbrow (not to be confused with the New York Review of Books, which, I know, I know, I should be reading instead.  Though, they do have an awesome tumblr).  
They recommended Lisa Lutz as an original voice in mystery series.  And somewhere, reading between the lines, I divined that she was a “diversity pick.”  Ergo, she must be black, and her main characters, a family of private investigators, are also black.  
So, I’m reading this book, The Spellman Files, the first in the series.  And the first characters described are all brunettes, though one has ivory skin, which gives me pause, but there is that Jasmine Guy who is pretty fair, and have you actually seen ivory close up, before it’s been cleaned and treated?  Not pure as the driven snow.  But then some of the members of the family start to have freckles, also within the realm of possibility, and then a couple have out and out blond hair.  So, that’s when I realize something is weird.  So, I look up Lisa Lutz, who is a very pretty, brunette, white lady.  And then, I realize that just because someone is original and different, doesn’t mean they’re a racial minority.  I also realize just how male dominated mystery writing is that being a woman is “different.”
So for the whole middle part of the book, the pictures in my brain of a black family are fighting with the obvious descriptions of a white family.  Every time an action of the protagonist is described, I automatically picture a black woman doing it (usually a Lisa Bonet-ish looking woman.  No, not all my black references come from “A Different World.”  But this was a book about a family who lived in a brownstone in a city, and well, a black family in a brownstone is always the Cosbys for me).  But then, I would remember she was white and have to superimpose Charlize Theron (from Young Adult, of course.  Perfect for the role in this book).  It’s getting in the way of me following the plot.  Finally I give up.  I picture them as black, and gloss over all subsequent descriptions.
So, I guess I’m a closet racist.  I realize that white people can write about black people, and vice versa.  But, the characters really were white, and the author being white was the weird piece of evidence I needed to convince me.  This reading thing is really getting me back to where I want to be.  Firmly rooted in the imaginary.
View high resolution

I’ve been trying to up my reading.  I failed last year, but this year, even though it’s only been 2 weeks, has been pretty good.  I wanted to mix some light in with the Serious Literary, so I decided to get into some mysteries.  I turned to the New York Times Book Review for some recommendations — don’t want to go totally lowbrow (not to be confused with the New York Review of Books, which, I know, I know, I should be reading instead.  Though, they do have an awesome tumblr).  

They recommended Lisa Lutz as an original voice in mystery series.  And somewhere, reading between the lines, I divined that she was a “diversity pick.”  Ergo, she must be black, and her main characters, a family of private investigators, are also black.  

So, I’m reading this book, The Spellman Files, the first in the series.  And the first characters described are all brunettes, though one has ivory skin, which gives me pause, but there is that Jasmine Guy who is pretty fair, and have you actually seen ivory close up, before it’s been cleaned and treated?  Not pure as the driven snow.  But then some of the members of the family start to have freckles, also within the realm of possibility, and then a couple have out and out blond hair.  So, that’s when I realize something is weird.  So, I look up Lisa Lutz, who is a very pretty, brunette, white lady.  And then, I realize that just because someone is original and different, doesn’t mean they’re a racial minority.  I also realize just how male dominated mystery writing is that being a woman is “different.”

So for the whole middle part of the book, the pictures in my brain of a black family are fighting with the obvious descriptions of a white family.  Every time an action of the protagonist is described, I automatically picture a black woman doing it (usually a Lisa Bonet-ish looking woman.  No, not all my black references come from “A Different World.”  But this was a book about a family who lived in a brownstone in a city, and well, a black family in a brownstone is always the Cosbys for me).  But then, I would remember she was white and have to superimpose Charlize Theron (from Young Adult, of course.  Perfect for the role in this book).  It’s getting in the way of me following the plot.  Finally I give up.  I picture them as black, and gloss over all subsequent descriptions.

So, I guess I’m a closet racist.  I realize that white people can write about black people, and vice versa.  But, the characters really were white, and the author being white was the weird piece of evidence I needed to convince me.  This reading thing is really getting me back to where I want to be.  Firmly rooted in the imaginary.

For all her verbal prowess, for all her prolific output, Ms. Rich retained a dexterous command of the plain, pithy utterance. In a 1984 speech she summed up her reason for writing — and, by loud unspoken implication, her reason for being — in just seven words.


What she and her sisters-in-arms were fighting to achieve, she said, was simply this: “the creation of a society without domination.”

Adrienne Rich, Influential Feminist Poet, Dies at 82 - NYTimes.com

“Nobody, nobody walks into a store and wants to see a runway video playing,” Mr. Marino, dressed in his customary motorcycle leathers and chain-embellished cap, said on Thursday at a dinner to open the store. Runway videos, he said, “are super low-end, like a Diesel store.”

On the design of the new Dior shop in NYC.

57th and St.-Honoré - NYTimes.com

The man has clearly never been to Mila’s in DC (not to knock Mila’s — it has its place.  Next time I go, I’ll suggest they get some TVs with runway videos to keep up with their direct competitor, Diesel.)

Don’t they look similar?  Obviously the Vena Cava show at NY Fashion Week just happened and Michael Drummond made that dress for the Phillip Treacy challenge months ago, just airing last month.  But it’s interesting that this style has been in the air as something cool for upcoming seasons. It’s so specific.

Also, I am a faithful reader of the Times’ On the Runway blog.  I used to get annoyed when they started posting other writers besides Cathy Horyn, but Eric Wilson’s “Fast Fashion” critiques of the current shows have been really fun to read.  I don’t follow the shows that much (I can’t obsessively refresh style.com — I would never get any work done), so it’s nice to have some sort of first pass editorial eye reducing them down to a couple ideas.

And if you’re not watching Project Runway this season, you must hate the human race.  The designers’ work has been really phenomenal, and the drama delicious.  Usually it’s one or the other (and I prefer the former), but both is even better!  My favorites: Mondo, April, and Michael D.   (The judging has been whack though, so I guess I understand why some may eschew it. OK, you don’t hate the human race. You hate the day-glo race that is Michael Kors.)

(Source: The New York Times)

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